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Reading at Rolleston

At Rolleston we believe that children learn best when there is consistency and continuity in our approach to the teaching of reading. We expect everyone across the school community to be involved so this policy has been written with clarity and a clear focus in mind.  It is our expectation that all children leave Rolleston as readers with a love of reading for lifelong learning and enjoyment.

Click on the titles underlined below to see how you can support your child's reading 

Starting to Learn to Read

Starting to learn to read-Things we can do at home

Mum makes sure the television is turned off and spends time helping her son do reading activities. Dad makes reading books an enjoyable time with his son and also hears him read.

Starting to learn to read-Things we can do when we're out and about

The family use their local library so that their son can enjoy more books. Dad lets his son choose his favourite books and shares good reading habits with him. They find a place in the library where they can talk and enjoy the books they have chosen.

Starting to learn to read- Things my child's school might be doing

Time is spent learning about letters and sounds. The school uses lots of fun activities and songs to keep the young children interested. The school gives lots of rewards to encourage the children to read.

Making early progress as a reader

Making early progress as a reader-Things we can do at home

Mum creates a special time with her daughter and encourages her by taking an interest in her book. When a school friend and her dad arrives it provides a chance to play a word game. Mum supports reading as a fun thing to do with friends.

Making early progress as a reader-Things we can do when we're out and about

Mum Combines play and reading at a free local visitor's centre. Mum reads along with her daughter when she needs help but doesn't take over or criticise. There is an unexpected opportunity to help write a poem.

Making early progress as a reader- Things my child's school might be doing

The children are taught new reading skills, even when they are becoming good readers. The teacher will follow-up their main teaching with activities to help children practise reading skills. The school uses stories to teach children to become expressive readers.

Becoming a more confident reader

Becoming a more confident reader- Things we can do at home

Sending and receiving letters provides a great opportunity for reading and writing. Mum breaks down difficult words to help her daughter read them. Mum and daughter spend special times together enjoying books without being distracted.

Becoming a more confident reader- Things we can do when we're out and about

Mum uses cooking together as an enjoyable activity to share reading for a purpose. Mum gives her daughter lots of simple reading tasks when they are out shopping together. Mum is always helping her daughter to learn new words without making it a test.

Becoming a more confident reader- Things my child's school might be doing

The teacher listens to each child read and gives lots of praise. The teacher uses interesting reading books as a starting point for new activities. Children are encouraged to explore the meaning of words.

A fluent reader

A fluent reader- Things we can do at home

The whole family has fun supporting Theo's reading and writing. Because Theo enjoys reading, he is happy to receive help correcting his work. Even though he can read well, both parents still read with their son. They are able to help with some of the more difficult words.

A fluent reader-Things we can do when we're out and about

The family buys books to have around the house. They use charity shops so they don't need to spend a fortune. The family choose books together, the older children are helping the younger child.

A fluent reader- Things my child's school might be doing

The school expects high standards and will use challenging reading material. The teacher uses several activities to make the learning interesting. The school sometimes uses older readers as a role models to support younger children's reading.

Able to read, but doesn’t like reading

Able to read, but doesn't like reading- Things we can do at home

Mum knows that reading isn''t her son's favourite activity so creates a balance between reading and playing. The older brother encourages Wasim's reading through their interest in football. The family has a good mixture of books that will interest the children.

Able to read, but doesn't like reading- Things we can do when we're out and about

The family goes to places together where they can find interesting things to read. Mum takes an interest in her son's reading even if she doesn't really like dinosaurs. Mum gives her son some money to encourage him to buy his favourite book.

Able to read, but doesn't like reading- Things my child's school might be doing

The teacher guides the reading of each child and gives them personal tips for improvement. The teacher encourages children to use a dictionary to learn about words they might not understand. The school uses technology to introduce another approach to reading.

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